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The Playlist: Paul McCartney’s Upbeat Outtakes and 9 More New Songs


Upbeat echoes of the Beatles’ White Album and “Abbey Road” run through two kindly new Paul McCartney songs — fully produced outtakes from his 2018 album “Egypt Station.” The Merseybeat bounce of “Home Tonight” offers a lift home as a small, friendly gesture as “the world is falling apart,” while “In a Hurry” moves from Beach Boys introspection to exultant vocal chorales carrying a pure McCartney sentiment: “Never too late to celebrate.” JON PARELES

There’s a palatial crescendo of grief in “Yellow Is the Color of Her Eyes.” Descending guitar chords, harking back to the spaciousness of “Abbey Road”-era Beatles, surround Sophie Allison’s voice, gathering and pealing as she mourns what sounds at first like an absence and is then, clearly, a death: “Loving you isn’t enough/you’ll still be deep in the ground when it’s done.” PARELES

PartyNextDoor has returned after a long absence with a little dose of July in the wintertime: a soft, undulating baptism of affection. “Loyal” is one of a pair of new songs, and it’s quasi-mystical in its tender incantations. JON CARAMANICA

The debut album from a bassist who has become a linchpin of Chicago’s vibrant jazz scene, “Ism” ranges as widely as one could imagine: from freely improvised freakouts to tracks of ambient percussion to dashing postbop. On “Baker’s Dozen,” a hypnotic hip-hop beat reigns, its coarse blend of saxophone, screeching ARP synthesizer, drums and bass reflecting the influence of Makaya McCraven, the Chicago drummer and beatsmith who co-produced “Ism” with Junius Paul. GIOVANNI RUSSONELLO

Jenn Wasner of Wye Oak sings with mixed emotions intertwining like the song’s steadily accumulating layers of vocals, guitars, keyboards and leaping bass lines. “Fortune” copes with a failed romance: verses grappling with loss, choruses seeking to move on. As she sings, “The truth is when it’s gone, it’s gone,” the music briefly finds tranquillity, then churns anew. PARELES

Lewis Capaldi currently has the No. 1 song in the United States, according to Billboard. I’ll give you a moment to absorb that. His first name is Lewis. His last name is Capaldi. He’s Scottish, and the latest in a line of soul-baked white British singers with broad, husky voices, a penchant for melodramatic songwriting and a copy of the Ed Sheeran playbook tucked away in their tattered wallet. “Someone You Loved,” which is at the peak of its reign, is pleasant enough and potently effective — emotionally abusive piano, resonant singing, a swell that could cause a tsunami. “Before You Go,” Capaldi’s new single, is like a conceptual remix of that song — almost all of the same component parts are there, just put in slightly different service. Capaldi still sings with his chest puffed, even though the tone of his voice is a little tender. When he gets to howling, it feels inevitable — the release you’re waiting for, but too ashamed to ask for. CARAMANICA

The pianist Marta Sánchez, who moved to New York from Madrid in 2011, has one of the most quietly memorable groups in jazz: a multinational quintet (each member was born in a different country) that plays her molten, Spanish folk-influenced compositions. Melodies become a three-way repartee between Sánchez and the group’s two saxophonists, Chris Cheek and Roman Filiu, and on “El Rayo de Luz” — the title track from the quintet’s newest album — the overlaying of two time signatures on top of each other lends everything a sense of both imbalance and propulsion. RUSSONELLO

SoundCloud rap changed around him, but Trippie Redd stayed the same. Still sings with a clenched throat and a vindictive attitude. Still unapologetically bruised. Still unflashily stirring. CARAMANICA

The arpeggios that course through “Eclipse (Ashley)” are neatly asymmetrical — seven beats, then six — to make the song ripple smoothly but never feel settled. Raphaelle Standell-Preston sings with openhearted earnestness about watching an eclipse as she assesses her life — “myself at the age of 27, questioning that the universe doesn’t trust in me” — and ends up celebrating a loving friendship; benevolence reigns. PARELES

In five years between releases, Tom Jenkinson a.k.a. Squarepusher switched back from using his own electronic-music software to analog and digital hardware with all their quirks; “Vortrack” is from an album due in January. What didn’t change is his aesthetic: nervy and dense, speedy and ominous, twitchy and unstable, with a distant, dissonant melody line besieged by a percussive overload until a final staticky swerve. His own Fracture remix, released simultaneously, maps “Vortrack” onto a drum-and-bass grid, but there’s more derangement in “Vortrack” itself. PARELES


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