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77 Pop and Jazz Albums, Shows and Festivals Coming This Fall


JUSTIN VIVIAN BOND AT JOE’S PUB Through a career spanning theater, film, cabaret and visual art, Justin Vivian Bond has continually defied gender and genre boundaries. With “Under the Influence,” Bond returns to Joe’s Pub (Sept. 27-Oct. 2) as part of Judy Collins’s Vanguard Residency. Bond pays homage to Collins by tracing her diverse vocal terrain and covering songs by giants, including Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen and Joni Mitchell, as well as Duke Ellington, Jacques Brel and Stephen Sondheim. Collins herself will appear (Nov. 18-27) with the Norwegian singer-songwriter Jonas Fjeld and the bluegrass group Chatham County Line, her collaborators on the upcoming folk album “Winter Stories.” Blending pop hits, Spanish boleros and original compositions, Migguel Anggelo eyes cultural stereotypes though an L.G.B.T.Q. lens in “LatinXoxo” (Oct. 15, Nov. 6-7). Also scheduled: Salty Brine (Sept. 18-19) with his latest “Living Record Collection” mash-up, in which Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” meets the Smiths’ “The Queen Is Dead.” — E.G.

JOHN COLTRANE Six months before he made his masterstroke, “A Love Supreme,” in late 1964, John Coltrane brought his quartet into the studio to record the soundtrack for an experimental Canadian film, “Le Chat Dans le Sac.” Just three pieces wound up in the movie, and the rest languished in storage; only now are these recordings being released as an album, “Blue World.” By the mid-1960s, Coltrane was moving at a creative sprint, and he rarely paused to revisit past items from his repertoire. These understated, screen-ready renditions of tunes like “Naima” and “Like Sonny” — on which Coltrane occasionally zips off into the turbulent, time-bending flurries that had become his signature — represent a rare moment of tranquillity, and something like repose. (Impulse!; Sept. 27.) — G.R.

ALESSANDRO CORTINI As a keyboardist in Nine Inch Nails and a collaborator with other electronic musicians, Alessandro Cortini harnesses analog synthesizers to generate pervasive, ominous suspense. His new album, “Volume Massimo,” actually relies less on volume than on atmosphere and melody; it’s a set of darkly pulsating instrumentals that march toward desolation. (Mute; Sept. 27.) — Jon Pareles

RAMSEY LEWIS Since the 1950s, the pianist and keyboardist Ramsey Lewis has been mining the territory between a head-nod and a full-on dance groove. His hits — including “The In Crowd,” from 1965, and “Sun Goddess,” featuring the members of Earth, Wind & Fire, a decade later — have always been peacemaking missions between jazz, funk and pop. He returns to that approach on “Urban Knights VII,” his first new album in eight years, on which he collaborates again with the ever-evolving ensemble known as Urban Knights. Slickly propulsive originals are interspersed here with a range of covers: Blues classics, the Beatles and Chick Corea all get their due. (Ropeadope. Sept. 27.) — G.R.

EMEL MATHLOUTHI The Tunisian songwriter Emel Mathlouthi became a voice of Arab Spring in 2012 with her song “Kelmti Horra” (“My Word Is Free”); she counts Joan Baez, Björk, Sinead O’Connor and the Lebanese songwriter Marcel Khalife among her influences. Her third album, “Everywhere We Looked Was Burning,” is her first with lyrics primarily in English; its somberly dramatic songs back her clear, dauntless voice with electronics, orchestral arrangements and sounds from nature. (Partisan; Sept. 27.) — J.P.

JON PARDI California-raised, Nashville-grown Jon Pardi cut a path through modern country’s embrace of pop, hip-hop and EDM by stubbornly sticking to fiddles, steel guitar and dive-bar jukebox energy. However, he’s no traditionalist, and his breakthrough 2016 album, “California Sunrise,” was a hard-rocking LP that split the difference between Alan Jackson and Bob Seger. Its follow-up, “Heartache Medication” — named after the kind prescribed by bartenders, naturally — continues that direction, with honky-tonkin’, boot-stompin’ tracks about whiskey, women and song. The first two are covered in the tender ballad “Don’t Blame It on Whiskey,” a duet with Lauren Alaina, written by Miranda Lambert and Eric Church. (Capitol Nashville; Sept. 27.) — C.W.


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