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4 Film Series to Catch in N.Y.C. This Weekend

Category: Art & Culture,Arts

Our guide to film series and special screenings happening this weekend and in the week ahead. All our movie reviews are at nytimes.com/reviews/movies.

THE CINEMA OF GENDER TRANSGRESSION: TRANS FILM at Anthology Film Archives (July 13-20). The theater’s recurring series on films that deal with transgender issues and the rejection of gender stereotypes returns with two movies that share a title but aren’t related: “Madame X: An Absolute Ruler” (on Sunday and July 20) is an allegorical extravaganza from the 1970s centered on a female pirate in the China Seas; the more recent “Madame X” (on Saturday and Thursday) is an Indonesian feature in which a hairdresser becomes a superhero. Also on the bill, Jennifer Montgomery’s “Deliver” (on Sunday and Tuesday) remakes a staple of adventure film machismo, John Boorman’s “Deliverance” (1972), with a cast of women.
212-505-5181, anthologyfilmarchives.org

THE NEW YORK WOMAN at the Quad Cinema (through July 19). The theater concludes its whopping series of 50 films featuring women in New York. The eclectic, vital roster includes the documentary “Model” (on Sunday), in which Frederick Wiseman turns his lens on advertising and the fashion industry; Leslie Harris’s acclaimed 1993 indie “Just Another Girl on the I.R.T.” (the director will be present at Saturday’s screening); and two films from opposite ends of Otto Preminger’s career: the dizzyingly complex 1947 love triangle “Daisy Kenyon,” in which Joan Crawford is torn between Henry Fonda and Dana Andrews, and the peculiar 1971 tragicomedy “Such Good Friends,” about a housewife (Dyan Cannon) who achieves a measure of liberation after her husband’s routine surgery goes as catastrophically wrong as they had joked it would. Elaine May, credited under a pseudonym, wrote the screenplay.
212-255-2243, quadcinema.com

‘ROPE’ at the Rubin Museum of Art (July 13, 9:30 p.m.). In 1948, in an interview with Popular Photography, Alfred Hitchcock described the shooting of what was then his latest picture — in which Farley Granger and John Dall play Leopold-and-Loeb-like murderers who host a dinner party for family and associates of their victim — as “a little like unpuzzling a Rube Goldberg drawing.” His goal was to present a screen story set over the course of one evening in continuous action, similar to how it might be performed onstage. The film unfolds in meticulously choreographed long takes. But the rare cuts — both to hide the ends of film reels and for dramatic punctuation — occur at significant moments; pay attention, too, to the occasions when the camera crosses the stage line. All this, and it was Hitch’s first color feature and first collaboration with James Stewart. The Rubin is showing it as part of a series of 12 movies, each connected to a different astrological sign. (There’s a pointed line in the film about the fact that Mr. Granger’s character is a Cancer.)
212-620-5000, rubinmuseum.org

Z CHANNEL PRESENTS at the Metrograph (July 13-15). In “Z Channel: A Magnificent Obsession,” Xan Cassavetes told the story of a 1970s and ’80s Los Angeles cable movie channel whose programmer, Jerry Harvey, killed his wife and himself in 1988. To accompany the 2004 documentary — which will screen on Saturday with a Q. and A. afterward — the Metrograph will show some highlights of the Z Channel’s heterodox programming. The titles include Michael Cimino’s “Heaven’s Gate” (on Friday and Sunday), which ran on Z when the film was still largely regarded as a bomb and had played in most of the country in a truncated version; and Stuart Cooper’s “Overlord” (on Sunday), which, despite having won a prize at the Berlin Film Festival in 1975, went unreleased theatrically in the United States until 2006. The story of a British soldier’s training during World War II, it mixes dramatic sequences with archival footage.
212-660-0312, metrograph.com


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